Is A Health Care Power Of Attorney The Same As A Living Will?

An advance directive in health care primarily comes in two different forms, a living will and a power of attorney. These are written instructions for people that help them to clarify what type of health care they do or do not want, if any situation renders them unable to make the decision themselves.

To fully understand the difference between living will vs power of attorney, it is important to look at each type in detail.

Why Do You Need A Mobile Notary Public?

Who Is A Notary Public?

Notary publics are appointed by the State government, e.g., Secretary of State, Governor, or Lieutenant Governor. In some cases they may also be appointed by the State Legislature. Their job is to act as witnesses to the signing process of different legal documents. They are there to confirm the identity of the person signing the document. A notary public cannot offer any legal advice or prepare legal documents, with a few exceptions such as Puerto Rico and Louisiana. In some states such as Florida notaries may draft protests against promissory notes and dishonored checks. In most cases a notary may also attest or certify a facsimile or a copy.

Notary Seal – An Important Responsibility

The misuse of a notary seal occurs too often. A notary seal is a symbol of authority just like the uniform of a soldier or a badge of a police officer, and it is supposed to be handled with the same level of responsibility. A commissioned notary is not allowed to lend his seal to anyone, lose it, or let anyone else use it under any circumstances without any exception. Whether intentional or by mistake, a notary public who allows anyone to use his seal could be liable to pay damages that may be incurred as a result of this act. The notary public can also face civil penalties or criminal charges for this misconduct.

There are two important points that need to be understood about the seal of a notary public:

Importance of Errors and Omission Insurance for Notary Public

What Is Errors And Omission Insurance?

Having an Errors and Omission insurance is absolutely important for a notary public. It is their cushion in the event of an unintentional mistake that can cause harm to the third party. Many people have the misconception that notary public do not need insurance because they are bonded. However, many people do not know that the bond is supposed to protect the public, and a notary has to repay the amount in case of a claim. An errors and omission insurance is necessary to protect the notary public in case of a claim. The notary public will not be asked to reimburse the amount to the insurance company.

How to Start a Business of Notary Public

A notary agent (also called a notary public) holds a very important job of authenticating and verifying the signatures on legal documents in various kinds of legal transactions. The requirements, procedures, and qualification required to be a notary public varies from state to state. Most of the states require the applicant to be at least 18 years of age, a legal and permanent resident of the state he/she is applying in and without any prior criminal record. Being a notary public will allow you to deal with a diverse clientele and starting a business of notary public will open many doors for you. Following are a few steps that you need to take in order to start your notary public business once you become a commission notary:

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